Putting an end

to sexualised

and

gender-based

violence

Putting an end to sexualised and gender-based violence

The preven­tion of and protec­tion against sexualised and gender-based violence is vital to the mainte­nance of world peace and inter­na­tional security, as the UN Security Council acknowl­edged in the year 2000. In the ground-breaking Resolu­tion 1325, it affirmed that sexualised and gender-based violence are connected with the failure of attempts to restore peace and security and to rehabil­i­tate societies. Germany is working to tackle the causes of gender-based violence; protecting women, children and men from sexualised violence; and providing support for survivors of sexualised violence.

Ursachen geschlechtsspezifischer Gewalt bekämpfen

Combating
the causes
of gender-based
violence

Azerbaijan

TV program­ming for gender equity

Project partner
Women's Associ­a­tion for Ration Devel­opa­ment (WARD), Center for Indepen­dent Social Research (CISR)

Language shapes the way we think and vice versa – and it influ­ences how we think about gender. The Sen Deme TV project is focused on exactly that: it seeks to help raise aware­ness of gender-conscious language and spark conver­sa­tion about existing percep­tions of gender roles and equal oppor­tu­ni­ties in Azerbaijan. In so doing, it is contributing to greater equity between the sexes and turning a spotlight on discrim­i­na­tion and inequality as causes of gender-based violence. In so doing, it is contributing to greater equity between the sexes and turning a spotlight on discrim­i­na­tion and inequality as causes of gender-based violence. Run by the Women’s Associ­a­tion for Rational Devel­op­ment, or WARD, the project receives funding from the Federal Foreign Office. It is partnered in Germany by the Berlin-based Center for Indepen­dent Social Research CISR e. V.

We learn how society works through televi­sion. We hear it on the news and on talkshows, but enter­tain­ment formats like films and sitcoms transmit societal values too. This is partic­u­larly true when it comes to the relation­ship between men and women, or their roles in society. The aim of this project is to commu­ni­cate gender-related values via televi­sion. Its approach is twofold. Firstly, ten themed TV programmes showcasing female role models will be broad­cast as an inspi­ra­tion to viewers. The idea is that discus­sions about discrim­i­na­tion and the obsta­cles women face will also make the viewing public more alert to the challenges that exist in Azerbaijan. . Secondly, in order to promote gender equity in the media on a long-term basis, a handbook and check­list are being put together which will be used to provide training for 60 journal­ists.

sexualisierter Gewalt

Protec­tion from
survivors of

Colombia

„Call it what it is“
Call it what it is: tackling all forms of sexual violence

Project partner
Women’s Initia­tive for Gender Justice (WIGJ)

For decades the armed conflict in Colombia was accom­pa­nied to a great degree by sexual and gender-based violence. The peace agree­ment which was signed by the govern­ment and the armed FARC group in 2016 couldn’t put a stop to this. Sexual violence remains a widespread problem within society. The number of sexual attacks has increased during the pandemic.

Often sexual violence isn’t reported or goes unpun­ished even if it is reported. There are many reasons for this. It is often the case that victims of sexual violence are stigma­tised and receive insuf­fi­cient help. They are put under pressure not to go to the police. Or they don’t have access to the justice system because they live in remote areas. In some cases, the experi­ences of survivors aren’t recog­nised as sexual violence. This is because while rape, forced pregnancy and forced steril­i­sa­tion are clearly defined in inter­na­tional law, other forms of sexual violence are not. This means that some acts, which survivors have experi­enced as sexual violence, aren’t taken into account in court proceed­ings. For example, these could be non-penetra­tive sexual acts, injuries to the sex organs as well as measures which deny people their right to choose to procreate.

In order to raise more aware­ness of all forms of sexual violence, the organ­i­sa­tion Women’s Initia­tives for Gender Justice and its partner organ­i­sa­tion Women’s Link World­wide are working on a publicity campaign with state insti­tu­tions. Workshops are to be carried out in partic­ular with judges and lawyers. In addition, they are devel­oping an app which will make infor­ma­tion about relevant author­i­ties and possible proce­dures for filing a police report avail­able to affected individ­uals, partic­u­larly young women.

Through this work the organ­i­sa­tion is making an impor­tant contri­bu­tion to better under­standing sexual violence. Only with this can we ensure that perpe­tra­tors are brought to justice, survivors receive adequate support and sexual violence is success­fully tackled.

Supporting
survivors of
sexual violence

Cameroon

Working together to overcome violence against women and girls

Project partner
Hope for the Needy Associ­a­tion Cameroon (HOFNA)

How can system­atic violence against women and girls be overcome in a region which is marked by conflict and violence? How can survivors of violence build new perspec­tives despite conflict and economic restric­tions? The Cameroonian organ­i­sa­tion Hope for the Needy Associ­a­tion (HOFNA) is seeking answers to these questions – and finding them in a networked approach.

Violent clashes between the security forces and separatist groups have been an everyday occur­rence since 2016 in the two English-speaking regions of Cameroon, South-West and North-West. The conflict parties have repeat­edly been accused of breaching human rights. Young girls and women in partic­ular are victims of sexual and gender-based violence.

Young girls and women in partic­ular are victims of sexual and gender-based violence. It has two objec­tives: to overcome violence against women and girls in the whole of Cameroon; and to support women and girls from disad­van­taged commu­ni­ties in taking on leading roles in politics and society so that they can confi­dently shape the devel­op­ment of their country.

As a result, the project encom­passes calls for both strength­ening partic­i­pa­tion of women in polit­ical processes and protec­tion against sexual and gender-based violence. At a national human rights confer­ence, HOFNA approaches civil society figures, women’s rights organ­i­sa­tions, tradi­tional and religious leaders, govern­ment repre­sen­ta­tives and security bodies. All of them are trained as points of contact for gender-based violence in their commu­ni­ties, together forming a national support network. In addition, inter­nally displaced girls and women in urban areas are supported in setting up small businesses or income-gener­ating activ­i­ties. In addition, inter­nally displaced girls and women in urban areas are supported in setting up small businesses or income-gener­ating activ­i­ties.

Afghanistan

Better protec­tion for men and boys who have been through sexualviolence

Project partner
All Survivors Project Founda­tion (ASP)

Afghanistan has suffered decades of armed conflict involving multiple actors, which has resulted in a heavily armed, militarised society. Afghanistan has suffered decades of armed conflict involving multiple actors, which has resulted in a heavily armed, militarised society. They also generate consid­er­able pressure on men and boys to conform to these norms, as rejecting them can bring dishonour and shame not only on the individual concerned but also on his family and wider commu­nity.

Sexual violence against children remains widespread in Afghanistan, within commu­ni­ties as well as in partic­ular contexts such as schools, workplaces and the streets. However, men and boys who have been through sexual violence face signif­i­cant obsta­cles in accessing health­care. They do not know their rights and, like women and girls, lack access both to medical care and to justice. This is compounded by the exclu­sion and stigma­ti­sa­tion often experi­enced by survivors of sexual violence. This is where the project run by the All Survivors Project founda­tion and its national partner, the Youth Health and Devel­op­ment Organ­i­sa­tion (YHDO), comes in, endeav­ouring to improve under­standing of the needs of young men and boys who have lived through sexual violence and to see those needs incor­po­rated into suitable guide­lines for medical care.

The overar­ching goal of the project is to facil­i­tate the devel­op­ment and avail­ability of health­care and support services for all survivors of sexual violence, including boys and men, in three provinces of Afghanistan. The project will equip state and non-state health­care providers with new knowl­edge, skills and tools to ensure that all survivors have access to appro­priate, high-quality and safe services that are suited to the cultural context as well as to the gender and age of those they support.

The Federal Foreign Office supports projects all over the world in these key areas: